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Hot Dogs

June 1, 2018

We all enjoy the summer - the sun, heat and BBQs. But make sure you keep an eye on your canine friends during this season, as they can get quite hot. 

 

If you see the mercury rising, here are some tips to keep your canine cool:

  • Offer an ice pack or wet towel to lay on

  • Add ice cubes to the water dish

  • Offer access to a wading pool with shallow, cool water

  • Offer access to cool shade by stringing up a tarp, cloth, or use a shade screen

  • Bring a collapsible water dish on your walks

  • Replace a portion of their regular diet with canned food

  • Avoid walking on hot pavement, and consider booties to insulate their toes

  • Early morning or evening playtimes, exercise, and walks are best

  • Give your dog some homemade frozen treats

 

Heatstroke in dogs: know the signs

  • Raised temperature (101.5° is normal)

  • Staggering

  • Muscle tremors

  • Fatigue or depression

  • Excess salivation and thickened saliva

  • Rapid breathing and panting

Dogs can suffer fatal heatstroke within minutes. Unlike humans, dogs can’t sweat through their skin and so they rely on panting and releasing heat through their paw pads and nose to regulate their body temperature and keep cool. Imagine wearing a thick winter coat on a hot summer’s day and you’ll understand why dogs succumb to heatstroke so easily.

If you spot these signs, get your dog inside and contact your vet.

Wrap your dog in cold wet towels, especially the underarm/belly/groin area. A fan may be used on the dog during the cooling process.

 

How to keep a dog cool and prevent heatstroke

  • Make sure your dog has access to clean water at all times, ideally a large bowl filled to the brim. Carry water and a bowl with you on walks

  • On hot days, walk your dog during the cooler parts of the day, in the early morning and late evening

  • Watch your pet for signs of over-heating, including heavy panting and loss of energy. If you recognise these signs when on a walk, stop, find a shady spot and give your dog water

  • Never leave your dog (or any pet) alone in a car, even with the windows open

  • Make cooling tasty treats by making ice cubes with your dog’s favourite food inside or stuff a Kong and pop it in the freezer

  • Be particularly careful with short nosed dogs such as bull breeds, boxers, pugs, older dogs, and those that are overweight. These dogs can get heatstroke simply by running around

 

 

Dehydration in dogs: know the signs

  • Sunken eyes

  • Gently pinch a fold of skin at the top of the neck. Is it slow to snap back?

  • Depression

  • Dry mouth

  • Lethargy

Not all signs of dehydration are easy to detect. If you suspect your dog may be dehydrated, a trip to the vet is recommended.

 

Keep dogs in the shade in the summer heat. 

 

Exercising in the summer

As at all times of the year, by law your dog should be wearing a collar and tag with your name and address on it. It’s also a good idea to put both your home and mobile phone number on the tag so you can be contacted immediately if your dog wanders off.

Since April 2016 it has been a legal requirement for dogs to be microchipped. Most importantly, keep the details up to date so that you can always be reunited with your dog.

 

Walking
  • Walk your dog at the cooler times of the day, either first thing in the morning or early evening

  • Dogs’ paw pads can burn on hot pavements. As a general rule, if it’s too hot for your hand it’s too hot for their paws.

 

Summer skin and coat

Pale-coloured dogs are vulnerable to sunburn, particularly on their ears, noses and sparsely haired areas. Sun damage can lead to skin cancer which may require extensive surgery – even amputation in severe cases. Sunlight can also make existing skin conditions worse, particularly if your dog has allergies.

Swimming is a great way to keep dogs cool, but stay safe

The best prevention is to keep your dog indoors when the sun is strongest, between 11.00am and 3.00pm. Alternatively, pop a T-shirt on your dog and cover vulnerable areas to protect them. You can also apply a non-toxic waterproof human sunblock or one specifically made for pets. If your dog’s skin looks sore, crusty or scaly, call your vet.

Take care of your dog’s delicate paws. If the pavement is too hot for your hand, it’s too hot for their paw pads too. Dog booties can be bought from pet shops and online, or walk your dog at cooler times of the day to prevent their paws burning.

 

Grooming your dog is important in the summer months, especially for longhaired breeds, to get rid of matts and tangles. A tangle-free coat will protect your pet’s delicate skin and help to keep them cool. Plus, if your pet’s coat is dirty and matted then you run the risk of flies laying their eggs and becoming maggots. Some breeds may need their coats trimming to keep them comfortable. Ask a professional groomer for advice.

If your dog swims or paddles in the sea to keep cool, remember to rinse the salt water and sand from your dog’s coat after to avoid drying out and irritating their skin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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